Aircraft at (Showbus), I.W.M. Duxford 2014

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TimBrown
Posts: 361
Joined: 05:59 Monday 4th July 2016
Location: Worcester

Aircraft at (Showbus), I.W.M. Duxford 2014

Post by TimBrown » 14:21 Saturday 1st October 2016

Really enjoyed this venue, hundreds of buses and it was possible to photograph vintage aircraft taxiing past just the other side of a fence!
Sep 21 2014 Showbus Duxford 235.jpg
Sep 21 2014 Showbus Duxford 121.jpg
Sep 21 2014 Showbus Duxford 189.jpg
Sep 21 2014 Showbus Duxford 194.jpg
Sep 21 2014 Showbus Duxford 201.jpg
Sep 21 2014 Showbus Duxford 203.jpg
Sep 21 2014 Showbus Duxford 205.jpg
Sep 21 2014 Showbus Duxford 209.jpg
Sep 21 2014 Showbus Duxford 227.jpg
Sep 21 2014 Showbus Duxford 234.jpg

chason
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Location: Bromsgrove

Re: Aircraft at (Showbus), I.W.M. Duxford 2014

Post by chason » 19:38 Saturday 1st October 2016

I am not really into planes but I've very much enjoyed looking at this superb collection of pictures of some fascinating looking aircraft. Thanks Tim.

MattW
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Location: Welland

Re: Aircraft at (Showbus), I.W.M. Duxford 2014

Post by MattW » 23:37 Saturday 1st October 2016

I love the early 'airliners' (is G_AKIF a De Havilland Dragon?) they're 8-) 8-) 8-) 8-)

TimBrown
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Re: Aircraft at (Showbus), I.W.M. Duxford 2014

Post by TimBrown » 10:07 Sunday 2nd October 2016

MattW wrote:
23:37 Saturday 1st October 2016
I love the early 'airliners' (is G_AKIF a De Havilland Dragon?) they're 8-) 8-) 8-) 8-)
Yes it is a Dragon Rapide built in 1944. I only expected to see this type of aircraft flying as it is used for short pleasure flights around the Duxford area, so all the other aircraft running past to do their flight checks was a bonus.

According to different websites the following info found;

The Hurricane seen coming into land is a Canadian Car Foundry built Mk. XII of 1942 vintage powered by a Packard Merlin 1,460 HP engine. Note the canopy is wide open on the approach, is this for better vision when landing or because the cockpit is very hot?

Harvard 1747 was also built by Canadian Car Foundry, but a little later in 1953; it is displayed in the marking of the Portuguese Air Force.

My favourite is Catalina G-PBYA which was built by Canadian Vickers in 10/1943 and is a true flying boat and amphibious aircraft powered by Pratt & Whitney twin Wasp engines of 1,200 HP each. A total of nearly 4,000 of these aircraft were built and played a big part in World War II being used on search and rescue, anti-submarine warfare, convoy duties and bombing - pretty versatile!

Regret I have not been able to identify the Spitfire, but it would appear to be a 'middle' mark as it has a four bladed prop, but not the all-round bubble cockpit of later marks.

AdamH
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Re: Aircraft at (Showbus), I.W.M. Duxford 2014

Post by AdamH » 21:34 Tuesday 4th October 2016

Dare I say... I enjoyed the aircraft more than the buses that year! :roll: I know very little about them but they were much more interesting.

TimBrown
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Re: Aircraft at (Showbus), I.W.M. Duxford 2014

Post by TimBrown » 12:51 Wednesday 5th October 2016

TimBrown wrote:
10:07 Sunday 2nd October 2016
MattW wrote:
23:37 Saturday 1st October 2016
I love the early 'airliners' (is G_AKIF a De Havilland Dragon?) they're 8-) 8-) 8-) 8-)
My favourite is Catalina G-PBYA which was built by Canadian Vickers in 10/1943 and is a true flying boat and amphibious aircraft powered by Pratt & Whitney twin Wasp engines of 1,200 HP each. A total of nearly 4,000 of these aircraft were built and played a big part in World War II being used on search and rescue, anti-submarine warfare, convoy duties and bombing - pretty versatile!
Have done a bit more research and the Catalina had a maximum speed of 196 MPH, economical cruise of 125 MPH and a range of 2,520 miles. It was able to carry 2,000 pounds of bombs and two torpedoes or four 325 pound depth charges and was armed with five machine guns, so not to be messed with!. The Twin Wasp R-1830 engine had two rows of seven cylinders each making 14 cylinders in all with 30 litres total capacity. Each engine produced 1,200 HP at 2,700 RPM for take-off and 700 HP at 2,325 RPM when cruising at 13,000 feet. The service ceiling was 15,800 feet.
May 24 2011 Cosford 172.jpg
Above is a cutaway of a twin row radial engine at RAF Cosford Museum, not sure if it is a Pratt & Whitney, but note that the connecting rod attached to the top piston furthest from the camera is part of a ring in which the crankshaft rotates. The other six connecting rods are attached to this ring which basically oscillates whilst the crankshaft spins thus transmitting the in-out 'vertical' motion of the pistons into the rotational motion of the propellor. I believe the propellors are geared to rotate a good bit slower than the engine. Note too, the air cooling fins, the nifty cam guide to the right and heavy balancing weight to the left. 173,618 of these engines were built during and just after World War II.

Although bigger in diameter and less aerodynamic than comparable vee or in line engines, radials were much shorter in length, lighter in weight and being air-cooled did not need glycol coolant which made them less susceptible to engine failure when hit by enemy armament. B17 bombers with this engine were known to keep flying with heavily damaged pistons allowing them to limp home.

By comparison the Packard Merlin engine is a liquid cooled 27 Litre capacity V12 engine producing maximum power at 3,000 RPM, but there are several levels of supercharger boost which could be used at different altitudes - if anyone can elaborate it would be appreciated. A total of 55,000 of this version was built and the British built engines totalled 149,659.

Also at RAF Cosford Museum was this DC3 Dakota powered by the Pratt & Whitney Twin Wasp engines seen suspended from the roof of one of the hangers. Note the lines of rivets on this lovely aircraft.
May 24 2011 Cosford 033.jpg
If ever you get the chance to see any of these radial engined aircraft flying, make a point of listening to those engines, not as sharp and crackling as a Merlin but a very distinctive soft noise on approach with an unmistakeable exhaust rumble as they pass. And if you are lucky enough to see a B17 in action marvel at how manoeuvrable and gracefully such a big old bomber flies and think of the skill of the crew putting their charge through its paces.

MattW
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Re: Aircraft at (Showbus), I.W.M. Duxford 2014

Post by MattW » 18:19 Wednesday 5th October 2016

Awesome mate thank 8-)

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